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Posts tagged ‘learning’

Learning French Through YouTube

Christmas is over and the new year has begun. As we rekindle last year’s failed resolutions to try to become more productive, why not try to turn a bad habit into a good habit?

I love YouTube for all of its counter-productive qualities, but why not turn those shameful YouTube binges into something more productive? Many of us are guilty of spending countless hours on YouTube watching everything from Harlem Shake renditions and twerking choreography to other shorts such as Marcel the Shell with Shoes On.

But believe or not, there are some really awesome YouTube channels for learning– and I mean learning for almost everything.

Maybe after you watch some Nyancat or Jenna Marble’s weekly Wednesday video, you could try out these two channels:

Learn French with Vincent

Vincent is a great guy that posts awesome videos teaching vocabulary, useful phrases, and French grammar. He seems to cover everything so far. I often sift through his grammar videos to learn new mechanics and reinforce whatever the heck my French teacher was talking about that I didn’t understand because… you know, she said it in French. I think this guy’s love of teaching language rather than profit shines through in these videos. I do a lot of my language learning with this channel, especially when I want grammar and review.

And trust me, there is PLENTY of material. He has posted over 200,ooo videos! And if English isn’t your native language, n’inquitéz pas (don’t worry) ! Either he, his friends, or his fans have converted them to cater to native speakers of German, Portuguese, Arabic… the list goes on.

Extra French avec sous-titres

Extra French

These are videos of an some old Discovery education series. I have no idea who uploaded these, but they’re awesome for several reasons. If you’re a beginner looking to reinforce the basics that you’ve learned, then you must watch these. In addition, the acting is god-awful and the writing is even worse, but honestly, it makes them that much more fun to watch.

It’s kind of like French version of “Friends” except… bad. But it’s in French!

You can tell whoever wrote this series was very intentional. They are good at implementing basic vocabulary, grammar, and repetition for reinforcement. Honestly, I wish more series likes this existed for language learning.

For more resources, check out my previous post here.

Are any of you learning a language at the moment? If so, which one and what have you found helpful?

Pardon My English

I came to Paris without having studied French other than a month or so before I left. Before then, my knowledge of French didn’t extend much beyond silly phrases from childhood cartoons– such as this:

We all loved this guy back in the day...

We all loved this guy back in the day…

I think it would be informative for me as well for others for me to recount what methods are working for me and which ones are not.

If you or someone you know is trying to learn another language, particularly French, then perhaps you’ll find this useful– and also, I’d love to hear from you.

What I have found to make this process difficult is the following:

Paris is inundated with English.

Paris is a #1 tourist destination and receives something around 20 or so million visitors per year. In result, English is everywhere. It’s the language of business and commerce, and therefore, it is the language world. Most locals and tourists can speak decent English and often use it on  a daily basis. This is great when you’re a tourist visiting for a few days, but not when you’re trying to learn French while living in Paris. The French immediately pick up your accent and will often switch to English.

However, I will not pin this as rude. I’ve read quite a number of blogs or heard accounts of people being offended when the French switch to English. If you visit and this happens to you, don’t take offense. It’s not because they don’t like your accent, it’s because they’re trying to accommodate you and they’re probably excited to practice English too. Just keep replying in French. If it’s someone you’re comfortable with or know personally, then ask them to speak to you in French.

On a related note, don’t feel intimidated to speak French (this is an issue I battled with everyday as well). Immediately address people here in French– and always precede your encounters by greeting them with “bonjour.” It means a lot to them for you to at least take a stab at French while asking for directions, even if you’re awful at it. (Which is another topic I’d like to address in the future.)

Before I left for Paris, I heard many stories about Parisians being rude and criticizing foreigners’ French. I’ve yet to feel any criticism or judgment. Yes, I have witnessed some confused expressions from those who couldn’t make sense out of whatever I managed to garble out. I honestly think that most feelings of being judged derive from one’s own lack of confidence.

Worst case scenario involves me giving up and apologizing. I often say (in French), “I’m sorry. I still learning French.” And that often eases the situation.

But really, English is everywhere.

Right now, I’m writing this article in a Starbucks in Opèra. They’re playing Christmas music– in English of course, and I’m referring to all the classics and contemporary renditions: Frank Sinatra to Michael Bublé. I feel more up-to-date on American cinema than I’ve been in the past few years. Most films are available in “V.O.” or “Version Originale” with French subtitles. Furthermore, going to the movies here is much cheaper, so I enjoy it much more often than I used to back home.

All in all, if you’d like to learn French in Paris, go for it! It’s available as long as you’re disciplined– but if you want to learn English too, that’s plenty available.

In my opinion, most key factors to learning a language, derive from motivation and discipline. I don’t care what articles are out there ranking how difficult one language is compared to another. I don’t agree with them. If you’re motivated and disciplined enough to learn, then you will learn.

In my past 3 months, I’ve picked up so much more French than I’ve expected to– and I want to share my tips and resources with everyone because I think I’ve found some great stuff that’s helpful! So for the next few weeks, I’ll be posting about this subject.

In the meantime, here are the simplest, yet most essentials tips. For anyone who has researched the best ways to learn a language, you’ve heard this over and over again, but my experience so far prove them to be axiomatic.

1. Stay disciplined. Study and practice every day.

2. Incorporate all facets of comprehension and production on a daily basis: listening, reading, speaking, and writing.

3. Go out of your comfort zone. Walk around and meet other people who only speak that language and make friends. You may spend a long time struggling to communication, but nothing expedites the process faster than immersion.